EDRDG 400/Lesson Plan
DAY 1:
PREPARATION:
Teacher Goal: The students will learn how to create connections from past experiences and apply them to new knowledge.

Objectives: The students will identify clues to the meanings of new vocabulary words. Students will also make predictions in the story and create possible solutions to the problem.

Indiana State Literacy Standards:
Decoding and Word Recognition
4.1.1-Read aloud grade-level-appropriate literary and informational texts with fluency and accuracy and with appropriate timing, changes in voice, and expression.
4.3.3 Use knowledge of the situation, setting, and a character’s traits, motivations, and feelings to determine the causes for that character’s actions.
4.3.2 Identify the main events of the plot, including their causes and the effects of each event on future actions, and the major theme from the story action.
4.5.1 Write narratives that:
• include ideas, observations, or memories of an event or experience.
• provide a context to allow the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience.
• use concrete sensory details.
4.5.2 Write responses to literature that:
• demonstrate an understanding of a literary work.
• support statements with evidence from the text.
• Comprehension
4.7.1 Ask thoughtful questions and respond orally to relevant questions with appropriate elaboration.
4.7.15 Connect and relate experiences and ideas to those of a speaker.

Materials: A-O-B page 1, 23 plastic magnifying glasses, Detective nametags, The Mystery of the Missing Lunch, laptop

BEFORE READING:
Motivational Activity: Students will listen to the theme song of Scooby Doo, which I will have already loaded from Youtube.com on my computer. After listening to the song I will ask the students to think about why I would want them to listen to this song before reading The Mystery of the Missing Lunch.

“This week our particular unit will be about Mysteries! Today we started off with the Scooby Doo theme song because I need you to be detectives this week! I have lost the “meanings” to my new vocabulary words that I have gathered from the story, The Mystery of the Missing Lunch! I need your help to find where they went!”

Set the purpose: I will then teach students to learn to identify clues from the story The Mystery of the Missing Lunch that reveal the meanings of the vocabulary words: assignments, consideration, allergies, accuse, suspicious, evidence, and consume. I will refer to a worksheet given from the suggested assessment. This worksheet will allow for students to understand the meaning of the vocabulary words and then apply them in their own sentence (check for understanding and text-to-self connections).

Introduce story:
To prepare the students for The Mystery of the Missing Lunch, I will start by using the graphic organizer to describe the book. I will put a picture of a sack lunch in the middle because that is the problem in the book. On the outside there will be suspects on who may have stolen the lunch. This is just a way to get the students to start thinking about a time when something of theirs was stolen.
After explaining the graphic organizer summary, I will break up the students into groups of four and have them do a discussion with one another. I want the students to describe a time where something of theirs was stolen and how did they go about finding it. The students must try to use some of the terms (assignments, consideration, allergies, accuse, suspicious, evidence, consume) in their story (check for understanding before proceeding).
Finally, before reading the story, I will have the students skim through the pictures. This will allow for the students to be detectives and come up with their own solutions to the story.

DURING READING
Model:
As the students and I read aloud the story The Mystery of the Missing Lunch, I will use the comprehension guidelines for the students. Before reading the story, I will check with the student’s understanding of the new vocabulary words (check for understanding). If there is confusion amongst the students, then I will briefly explain what the term means. Since the students are detectives, they will have to learn to make predictions of what will come next in the story.
In order to keep the students thinking on the right track, there are guidelines that I will follow to help develop the student’s comprehension. I will use guided questions to make sure I know the students understand exactly what is going on in the story. For example, a-teacher-think aloud reads: Both Emily and Mrs. Richmond suggest possible reason why the lunch is missing. Yet Ramon is certain it was in the closet. I wonder who is right. Based on what you have read so far, can you tell who is correct? Now students can act like detectives and apply the strategy in a Think Aloud. A typical student response may share, “No, I can’t really tell. There is no clear evidence in the story to back up what any of the characters believe. So far, any of them could be correct.” I will explain to my students that Thinking Aloud is a why for students to make inferences and analyze the situation and make predictions. Soon enough the students will learn to make their own inferences and analysis without me modeling a situation.
During the story, I will point out the new vocabulary words and ask the students to identify what they mean. The students will have to remember to use context clues to help them figure out the meaning (check for understanding). At the end of the story, I will also ask students to summarize to me what the story is about (check for understanding-sequence). This will apply to see a sequential order of events in a story.

Guided Practice:
I will have the students work together with partners and begin making connections in the story. I will walk around and listen to the students read. I will check for fluency in how the student’s tone of voice and expression are presented. I will also encourage more critical thinking since these students will be role-playing as detectives! The students will be reminded to pay attention to the vocabulary words and make sure they understand the meaning and can say it in their own words (check for understanding).
The paired students will work on the Problem and Solution worksheet. This worksheet will start off with the problem and then the students work on filling in the blanks. The worksheet also connects with sequencing because students have to go in order from the problem, action taken, and then solution (check for understanding).

AFTER READING
Extended Independent Practice/Application:
At the end of the lesson, I will have the students reflect on the day. The students will do a writing activity: Describe a time when something of yours was stolen. What were the sequences of events that you went about finding your stolen item?”
Assessment: I will be able to assess the student’s performance by creating a rubric.
Story Writing : Personal Narrative
Teacher Name: Ashlee Spearman
Student Name: ________________________________________ SCORE:___/12

CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Focus on Assigned Topic The entire story is related to the assigned topic and allows the reader to understand much more about the topic. Most of the story is related to the assigned topic. The story wanders off at one point, but the reader can still learn something about the topic. Some of the story is related to the assigned topic, but a reader does not learn much about the topic. No attempt has been made to relate the story to the assigned topic.
Solution/Resolution The solution to the character\'s problem is easy to understand, and is logical. There are no loose ends. The solution to the character\'s problem is easy to understand, and is somewhat logical. The solution to the character\'s problem is a little hard to understand. No solution is attempted or it is impossible to understand.
Problem/Conflict It is very easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem. It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem. It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face but it is not clear why it is a problem. It is not clear what problem the main characters face.

REFLECTION: This day one lesson plan is designed for students to create inferences and use context clues by reading a text. Students will be able to succeed in learning ways to make predictions about what will come next in a story. They will also learn about finding context clues when searching for the meaning of a vocabulary word.

DAY TWO:
PREPARATION:
Teacher Goal: The students will learn how to create connections from past experiences and apply them to new knowledge.

Objectives: The students will identify clues to the meanings of new vocabulary words. Students will also make predictions in the story and create possible solutions to the problem. Students will determine the order of sequential events.

Indiana State Literacy Standards:
Decoding and Word Recognition
4.1.1-Read aloud grade-level-appropriate literary and informational texts with fluency and accuracy and with appropriate timing, changes in voice, and expression.
4.3.3 Use knowledge of the situation, setting, and a character’s traits, motivations, and feelings to determine the causes for that character’s actions.
4.3.2 Identify the main events of the plot, including their causes and the effects of each event on future actions, and the major theme from the story action.
4.5.1 Write narratives that:
• include ideas, observations, or memories of an event or experience.
• provide a context to allow the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience.
• use concrete sensory details.
4.5.2 Write responses to literature that:
• demonstrate an understanding of a literary work.
• support statements with evidence from the text.
• Comprehension
4.7.1 Ask thoughtful questions and respond orally to relevant questions with appropriate elaboration.
4.7.15 Connect and relate experiences and ideas to those of a speaker.

Materials: Workbook page, The Mystery of the Missing Lunch, The Case of the Blurry Board

BEFORE READING:
Motivational Activity:
Students will listen to the theme song of Scooby Doo again. This will remind students that they need to be thinking like detectives! Before reading today, we will read a short story called The Case of the Blurry Board.

Set the Purpose:
Our focus question will be, “How was Jason’s method solving a problem similar to Ramon’s?” (text-to-text connection and check for understanding).
“Today we will be using our detective thinking hats and building onto what we had learned yesterday! We will read a quick short story and discover new connections between the story and The Mystery of the Missing Lunch. Later, we will be discussing the story The Mystery of the Missing Lunch more fluently. Also we will add onto our Word Wall the new vocabulary you have learned from the story.”

DURING READING
Modeling:
I will model for the students an activity sheet that they will complete on practicing to pause after commas and stop after sentences. Next, I will explain to the students about how to explain ideas or vocabulary in their own words (This is where we will add the vocabulary words to our Word Wall). I will have the students explain to me what they learned about how to make predictions and inferences before turning the page. This section was the Think Aloud (check for understanding).

Guided Practice:
While the students read the book The Mystery of the Missing Lunch, I will be looking for their fluency in reading. Are the students pausing after commas and stopping after sentences? (check for understanding) With partners, the students will complete the worksheet that consists on adding slash marks to where the students will pause and stop while reading.
The students will be broken up into groups where they will be working with their partners to create their own summary of the book. (check for understanding) I want the students to think and compare the stories The Mystery of the Missing Lunch and The Case of the Blurry Board. Some ideas I will write on the board that students will think and compare include: problem and solution, analyzing, text to self.
I will first explain to the students that in a story there is usually a problem, then turning point(s), and a solution. On their own students will work on a comprehension sheet, Problem and Solution) where they will review how to identify the problem and solution. I will walk around the room to make sure the students are on track and ask questions that will allow them to think more critically. (check for understanding). For example: What clues do both of the boys find when solving the problem? What do both characters notice that look the same? After the students have completed their chart, I will have them work in groups to compare and contrast answers. This allows room for more learning and making connections.

AFTER READING:
Extended Independent Practice/ Application: The students will write a response to the question, “Do you think you would be a good mystery solve? Why or why not?” The students will need to incorporate their new vocabulary words into their response. The students will also write another story that is in sequential order about another time they were on a search for something that went missing of theirs.

Story Writing : Are You a Good Mystery Solver?
Teacher Name: Ashlee Spearman

Student Name: ________________________________________

CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Vocabulary Student used all 7 vocabulary words Student used 4-6 vocabulary words. Student used 2-3 vocabulary words. Student used 0-1 vocabulary word.
Writing Process Student devotes a lot of time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works hard to make the story wonderful. Student devotes sufficient time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works and gets the job done. Student devotes some time and effort to the writing process but was not very thorough. Does enough to get by. Student devotes little time and effort to the writing process. Doesn\'t seem to care.
Organization The story is very well organized. One idea or scene follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions. The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used. The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are sometimes not clear. Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.

Reflect: The students have learned so much in this 90-minute period block. Students have learned how to read with flow and guidance. They will succeed with creating a Problem and Solution chart in a story. The students have learned about how a story consists of a problem, turning point(s), and a solution. I would adapt my lesson for students if my students were falling behind.